Isolation, like Jupiter and Mars

That’s a line from ‘Catch A Star,’ an obscure track from Business As Usual, the first album by Men At Work, and it popped into my head as I was hiking down to my shooting locale this morning because I was heavily influenced by that album when it was released – we read more

On this date 59

Boy, it’s been a while, hasn’t it? But I noticed that I haven’t posted anything for December 1st in the past three years, and decided to rectify that. This was a good choice, because I’ve shot quite a few photos on December 1st, though mostly in two specific years, so I have plenty to work with.

We’ll start with 2008.


A read more

29 minutes of playtime

Going out for something last night, I noticed the moon was sharp and in a good position up over Walkabout Studios to take advantage of, and decided to fire off a few frames. I did not, despite the previous post, bother to try for some meteor photos – that would have come much later in the night hours (technically the wee hours of the morning) as the moon dropped lower, and I had no intentions read more

Haven’t broken that cycle yet

You know when I mentioned earlier that not a lot of things were going right? Yeah, still at it.

We’ll start with a photo outing with Mr Bugg, intended to chase birds and the sunset, though I already suspected the sunset wouldn’t be too fascinating, since the sky was completely free of clouds. We had several good passes from vultures and osprey, but for reasons unknown, the autofocus on read more

Too cool, part 36: Better than a lava lamp

And I like lava lamps.

This video comes courtesy of NASA, and the Astronomy Picture of the Day. It’s an elaborate computer simulation based on satellite and weather data, and shows the wind activity in the north Atlantic just a few months ago, during the peak of hurricane season.

It’s surprising to see such detail so soon after the season occurred, but it gives us a good view of how the read more

Not the right kind of composition


Just a quick image from tonight, as Jupiter passed close to the moon. Or at least, from the given perspective of one position in the universe presently occupied by Earth. Jupiter has often been much closer to the moon, distance-wise, even when not visible in the sky at all.

This is admittedly both not very good, and a digital composite. The reason for the composite is the wide disparity in light read more